FUNCTIONAL BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT AND PLAN

AS PART OF OUR COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, FAMILY PRIORITY WILL COMPLETE A THOROUGH FBA. FBA IN ABA STANDS FOR FUNCTIONAL BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT. RESULTS OF THE FBA WILL BE USED TO CREATE AND IMPLEMENT AN INDIVIDUALIZED BEHAVIOR

Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)

A Functional Behavior Assessment is a systematic process used in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) to understand the purpose or function of a behavior. ABA is a therapeutic approach that aims to improve socially significant behaviors by understanding the environmental factors that influence them. The purpose of conducting an FBA is to determine why a behavior is occurring. This involves identifying the antecedents (what happens before the behavior), the behavior itself, and the consequences (what happens after the behavior). By understanding the function of the behavior, behavior analysts can develop effective behavior intervention plans to address and modify the behavior in question.

In Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), behavior analysts often categorize the main functions of behavior into four primary categories, known as the “Four Functions of Behavior.” These functions help to understand why individuals engage in specific behaviors. The four main functions of behavior are:

Attention

Some behaviors occur because the individual seeks attention from others. This attention may be positive (e.g., receiving praise or interaction) or negative (e.g., being reprimanded or scolded). Attention-seeking behaviors are often reinforced by the attention they receive.

Escape/Avoidance

Behaviors may occur because the individual wants to escape or avoid a particular situation or demand. These behaviors often happen when the individual finds the current situation aversive or uncomfortable. By engaging in the behavior, the individual may successfully escape from or avoid the undesired situation.

Access to Tangibles/Activities

Some behaviors occur because the individual wants access to specific items, activities, or privileges. These behaviors are motivated by the desire to obtain something desirable. For example, a child might engage in a tantrum to gain access to a favorite toy or activity.

Sensory Stimulation

Behaviors may occur because they provide sensory stimulation or self-soothing for the individual. These behaviors are not necessarily motivated by external events or consequences but rather by internal sensory experiences. Examples include rocking, hand-flapping, or repetitive vocalizations.

Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)

FBA is a systematic process used in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) to understand the purpose or function of a behavior. ABA is a therapeutic approach that aims to improve socially significant behaviors by understanding the environmental factors that influence them. The purpose of conducting an FBA is to determine why a behavior is occurring. This involves identifying the antecedents (what happens before the behavior), the behavior itself, and the consequences (what happens after the behavior). By understanding the function of the behavior, behavior analysts can develop effective behavior intervention plans to address and modify the behavior in question.

In Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), behavior analysts often categorize the main functions of behavior into four primary categories, known as the “Four Functions of Behavior.” These functions help to understand why individuals engage in specific behaviors. The four main functions of behavior are:

Attention

Some behaviors occur because the individual seeks attention from others. This attention may be positive (e.g., receiving praise or interaction) or negative (e.g., being reprimanded or scolded). Attention-seeking behaviors are often reinforced by the attention they receive.

Escape/Avoidance

Behaviors may occur because the individual wants to escape or avoid a particular situation or demand. These behaviors often happen when the individual finds the current situation aversive or uncomfortable. By engaging in the behavior, the individual may successfully escape from or avoid the undesired situation.

Access to Tangibles/Activities

Some behaviors occur because the individual wants access to specific items, activities, or privileges. These behaviors are motivated by the desire to obtain something desirable. For example, a child might engage in a tantrum to gain access to a favorite toy or activity.

Sensory Stimulation

Behaviors may occur because they provide sensory stimulation or self-soothing for the individual. These behaviors are not necessarily motivated by external events or consequences but rather by internal sensory experiences. Examples include rocking, hand-flapping, or repetitive vocalizations.

What Comes After The Assessment?

Cornerstone to the comprehensive care provided by Family Priority is the Individualized Behavior Plan. A behavior plan in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a structured and individualized intervention designed to address specific behavioral challenges or goals of an individual. It is based on the principles of behavior analysis and aims to modify behavior by systematically implementing strategies that are effective in promoting positive behavior change.

FUNDING PROVIDED BY

  • EPSDT/Medicaid

  • Tricare and Private Insurance

  • Self pay

  • CSA

  • Medicaid Waiver Services for Adults

What Comes After The Assessment?

Cornerstone to the comprehensive care provided by Family Priority is the Individualized Behavior Plan. A behavior plan in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a structured and individualized intervention designed to address specific behavioral challenges or goals of an individual. It is based on the principles of behavior analysis and aims to modify behavior by systematically implementing strategies that are effective in promoting positive behavior change.

FUNDING PROVIDED BY

  • EPSDT/Medicaid

  • Tricare and Private Insurance

  • Self pay

  • CSA

  • Medicaid Waiver Services for Adults

Individualized Behavior Plan

Family Priority’s behavior plan is a comprehensive and systematic approach to promoting positive behavior change and improving the quality of life for individuals with behavioral challenges. It is individualized, evidence-based, and focused on addressing the specific needs and goals of the individual receiving services.

Behavioral Goals/Objectives

Behavior plans specify the desired behaviors that the individual should demonstrate. These goals are often specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART). They are based on the individual’s needs and may target behaviors such as increasing appropriate social interactions, decreasing disruptive behaviors, or improving daily living skills.

Intervention Strategies

Based on the information gathered from the FBA, behavior analysts select and implement specific intervention strategies tailored to the individual's needs. These strategies may include positive reinforcement, prompting and fading procedures, teaching replacement behaviors, modifying the environment, and teaching coping skills.

Data Collection and Monitoring

Behavior plans often include methods for collecting data to track progress toward behavioral goals. Data collection allows behavior analysts to monitor the effectiveness of the interventions and make data-driven decisions about adjustments to the behavior plan as needed.

Collaboration and Training

Behavior plans often involve collaboration among various stakeholders, including behavior analysts, caregivers, educators, and other professionals working with the individual. Training and support are provided to ensure consistency in implementing the behavior plan across different settings and contexts.

Individualized Behavior Plan

Family Priority’s behavior plan is a comprehensive and systematic approach to promoting positive behavior change and improving the quality of life for individuals with behavioral challenges. It is individualized, evidence-based, and focused on addressing the specific needs and goals of the individual receiving services.

Behavioral Goals/Objectives

Behavior plans specify the desired behaviors that the individual should demonstrate. These goals are often specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART). They are based on the individual’s needs and may target behaviors such as increasing appropriate social interactions, decreasing disruptive behaviors, or improving daily living skills.

Intervention Strategies

Based on the information gathered from the FBA, behavior analysts select and implement specific intervention strategies tailored to the individual's needs. These strategies may include positive reinforcement, prompting and fading procedures, teaching replacement behaviors, modifying the environment, and teaching coping skills.

Data Collection and Monitoring

Behavior plans often include methods for collecting data to track progress toward behavioral goals. Data collection allows behavior analysts to monitor the effectiveness of the interventions and make data-driven decisions about adjustments to the behavior plan as needed.

Collaboration and Training

Behavior plans often involve collaboration among various stakeholders, including behavior analysts, caregivers, educators, and other professionals working with the individual. Training and support are provided to ensure consistency in implementing the behavior plan across different settings and contexts.

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